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This Should Not Be Possible

Monday, March 10th, 2014

pineapples

You are looking at several pineapple plants that overwintered in San Jose, Ca. The weather is warm now, but we had some really cold days this winter that were down into the teens.  How could these plants have survived?  The plants are sitting next to my house.  My house is constantly radiating heat….apparently enough heat for the pineapple plants to not only survive, but to thrive!

Keep this in mind next year when have some plants that you want to protect.  Now, those of you in the Midwest and East that have had EXTREMELY cold spells will definitely not benefit from this, but those in moderate climates may just be able to capture enough heat to save some of your favorite plants next winter.

 

Are You Enjoying These Tips?

Sunday, February 23rd, 2014

Do you enjoy reading these tips? I hope you are finding them useful.

Depending on the response, I’m considering sending out these tips weekly. I’m having some work done on my site, so I don’t want to add an opt in page on my current site until that is all done.

If I get enough response, and if you would like to be on the Tip list, simply go to the contact us page and send me an email saying, “Add me to the list”.

HOT TIPS – How to get organic fertilizer on the cheap

Sunday, February 16th, 2014

Organic fertilizer can be expensive.  Want an inexpensive alternative?

Horse/Cattle feed pellets from your local farm supply are a great source of NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potasium)….the feed even contains molasses, which is the perfect treat for the microbes in your soil!   Just sprinkle the mixture around your plants and water it in.

The combination of these pellets, along with some vermicompost (For beneficial bacteria) cannot be beat!

 

I hope you find these Tips enjoyable and educational. Feel free to share with your friends and neighbors. I ask only that any reproduced information be properly linked to this website.

HOT TIPS – Grow Your Own Wheat Grass Quickly And Easily

Sunday, February 9th, 2014

Do you love wheat grass?  Want to grow your own like a pro?  When your worms have turned their bedding into nice rich vermicompost, simply harvest the worms and add some wheat grass seed to the top of the bedding.  Remove the lid from your bin so the wheat grass seeds are exposed to light.  Mist gently.  Within a few days you will have a carpet of wheat grass to enjoy.

EVERYTHING sprouts in a worm bin!

DO NOT  add  the seeds to the top of your worm bin when the worms are still inside.  You’ll create a green mat on top of your worms.  Getting to your worms again would be much like pulling out a lawn!  Don’t ask me how I know..LOL

 

I hope you find these Tips enjoyable and educational. Feel free to share with your friends and neighbors. I ask only that any reproduced information be properly linked to this website.

 

HOT TIPS – Two COMPLETELY different ways to raise red wigglers

Sunday, February 2nd, 2014

I recently watched a video of my friend Bentley from RedWormComposting.com showing how he had GOBS of worms in his Worm Inn MEGA system,  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sv8s6EW6NkI

Bentley used what I call the “Active” method for composting:

  • Starts with a small amount of worms.
  • Chops up or processes food waste prior to adding to the system.
  • Starts relatively small (Relative to the size of the MEGA, he started out only about 25% full.
  • Primary goal is creating worm mass.
  • The worms can be found in the target area with broken down food.

 

The method I usually use would be considered, “Passive” composting:

  • Starts out with a larger amount of worms (5-10 pounds for a Worm Inn MEGA).
  • No chopping of food waste at all.  Just throw fruit and veggie waste in as if filling a garbage can.  (Whole apples with spots…no problem).
  • Start larger (I’ll fill the unit up with damp, fluffed bedding and all the fruit and veggie scraps that will fit).
  • Primary goal is composting all my fruit and veggie waste with as little effort as possible.
  • The worms will be found in pockets around the system depending on what fruits/veggies break down first.

Please note:  Because plastic systems do not breathe well (Regardless of how they are marketed), passive composting can lead to problems.   If you were to put several gallons of produce scraps in a plastic bin, you’re likely to create a sewer.  First, the material will heat up, then it will off gas, and finally it will stink like anaerobic sewage sludge leading to a total worm die off. 

If you have a plastic system, be very careful how many produce scraps you add at once so you do not kill your worms.

I hope you find these Tips enjoyable and educational.  Feel free to share with your friends and neighbors.  I ask only that any reproduced information be properly linked to this website.

 

HOT TIPS – Excite your children with a huge cluster of worms

Saturday, January 25th, 2014

Want to learn a cool trick your kids will love? Add a handful of unsweetened dry oatmeal to the top of your worm bedding. Cover lightly with a single sheet of newspaper. The next day, bring your child out to watch the worms all dive down at once when you lift up the paper blanket. Don’t blink…the little suckers are very quick.

Caveat: Too much oatmeal can sour your bedding. Never add more than a handful, and avoid mixing it into the bedding. This is definitely one of those situations where “Less is more”.

I hope you find these Tips enjoyable and educational. Feel free to share with your friends and neighbors. I ask only that any reproduced information be properly linked to this website.

HOT TIPS – Stop your Worms From Drowning!

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Did you recently purchase a plastic stackable worm composter? Want to learn the best way to set it up? The directions will tell you to add newspaper or cardboard (To the inside bottom of the tray that sits on the base), as a way of preventing worms from ending up in the base. The problem with this is……Think about it for a sec…The worms will eat through that newspaper/cardboard very quickly!

A MUCH better solution to prevent worms from ending up in the base (And dying/stinking in the stagnant water) is to use Weed Stop (The fabric barrier that goes under rocks to prevent weeds) as a permanent strainer for your system, in lieu of a layer of paper/cardboard on the bottom. Cut the weed stop so that it goes up the sides a bit to make it more difficult for your worms to go around it.

PS. The Weed Stop should ONLY be placed on the inside of the bottom tray that makes contact with the base. If you try using it between trays, your worms will never be able to migrate between trays.

I hope you find these Tips enjoyable and educational. Feel free to share with your friends and neighbors. I ask only that any reproduced information be properly linked to this website.

HOT TIPS – Everyone Loves Humus!

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Love rich earthy Humus? No, this isn’t the stuff you spread on Pita, but it is the stuff that is WONDERFUL for worms and plants. Typically, Humus takes months to produce from traditional compost. Here’s a quick and easy shortcut: Fill a garbage can half full with dried leaves. Use your weed eater to shred thoroughly. Spread this mixture over the top of your soil and it will turn into humus very quickly!

You cannot buy this stuff from the garden center at any price!

I hope you find these Tips enjoyable and educational. Feel free to share with your friends and neighbors. I ask only that any reproduced information be properly linked to this website.

HOT TIPS – Stop Wandering Worms in Their Tracks

Wednesday, January 1st, 2014

Have you experienced Red Wigglers “Escaping”? This is more typical in a plastic bin/tray system, as Red Wigglers love to explore the plastic sides. This really becomes an issue when the worms start ending up on your floor!

To stop “Explorer’s” from becoming “Escapees”, simply put some dishwashing soap on your fingertip, and line the inside lip of the bin/tray with the soap. The worms will go to the soap, but will not cross it.

If you continue to have a problem, get immediate help from an experienced worm wrangler. If your worms are willing to cross the ring of soap, they are in a really negative environment, and you need to adjust your setup quickly.

PS. Use only enough soap to line the rim. Giving your worms a Bubble Bath is not recommended!

PPS. Worms never wander from The Worm Inn. No need to deal with this if you are a Worm Inn owner.

I hope you find these Tips enjoyable and educational. Feel free to share with your friends and neighbors. I ask only that any reproduced information be properly linked to this website.

Coming Soon….Worm and Garden Tips and Tricks

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

After hundreds of blog posts, it gets really hard to think of new and relevant material.  After spending the day in the backyard yesterday, I realized, I’ve got some really cool things going on RIGHT NOW.  Plus, I love experimenting.

So, the wheels started turning in my head and I thought…The people that read this blog are the same people that would probably be interested in seeing these experiments….most of which you’ve probably never seen or heard about before.

Watch this space to see what I’ve got growin on!